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the technology being deployed is in fact say. some proponents of drones, drowned technology have argued current safeguards provided -- drone technology have argued current safeguards provided a sufficient level of technology. we have on the books, walls we are ready have on the books related to other technologies that can overlap and include this type of technology. remedies that provide similar of it -- civil remedies for violations of the loss. some have suggested the legal protection should apply leg ally to drones. sufficientey may be to alleviate problems or concerns. in your view, is this approach correct and what are the main differences between manned and unmanned aircraft as it relates to the protection of americans for privacy concerns and rights under the fourth amendment? >> think you for the question. we do not believe there are federal statutes that would provide surveillance in the united states. the privacy laws that exist are very targeted. the approach the united states has taken to privacy do not encompass the type of surveillance the drones are able to conduct. advocating fo
drone technology -- demonstrates how prevalent drone technology is being affected. they can be purchased online for a few hundred dollars and then equipped with high definition video cameras without being detected. it is not hard to imagine the serious privacy problems this type of technology could cause. a state like mine, vermont, we protect and guard our privacy. this is raising some very serious questions from people from the far right to the far left. o we can't take a shortsighted view. technology in this area will advance at incredible rate. so i hope this hearing will just be the beginning of the dialogue. to help this committee explore some of these issues, senator grassley and i have invited witnesses who will testify. we'll hear from law enforcement officials as a fully operational unmanned unit. we'll hear from the leading unmanned vehicle industry group. a representative electronic privacy information center. and a scholar who has studied the intersection of drone technology. i appreciate them being here. senator grassley. >> before going to my statement, listening to you, i
technologies than the legitimate investigative needs of law enforcement professionals. we are eager to hear about the constitutional considerations for the level of judicial review for stored communications. we must also consider the lawful access for the government theivil litigation, when government is the defendant. we must examine the effect that reform would have on the investigations at the stake and local level. the day's hearings will focus communications. one ors transmitted to more recipients. they apply to what kind of stored communications? our goal is to ennact the reforms as we move forward in the digital age. it is no secret privacy is harder to maintain but americnas betweenuldn not provide the internet -- you would keep this in a filing cabinet instead of a bulletin board. you would hide it behind the itsword rather than post on facebook. our expectations haven't changed. ammendment protects more than ludites. we risk stunting economic growth. i look forward to hearing from all witnesses and recognize mr. scott from virginia. forhe sub-committee meets the cyber-ghreats in c
time. we have spoken in the past about using dna technology to solve serious crimes. 2007 was a time around /2008 when the crime lab had an enormous backlog of samples. it was a lot of work, but by using technology and with the support of this committee, the fbi has cleared the backlog. a report from 2010 found there was a substantial fbi dna case or a backlog, but an update published in september found the backlog is now very low and well managed. in both cases, i commend you and your staff for their hard work in bringing that up to date. have no doubt that by improving turnaround time for dna evidence, that we are solving serious crimes and preventing additional people from becoming victims. there are many state and local crime labs around the country that have not been as successful as the fbi. i hope that you and the fbi lab can share the lessons you have with state and local governments. i want to touch on familial search, which we have talked about before. this is a method of searching offender dna database system determined its dna from a crime scene has a familial relationshi
in memory. we do not know how that works. with technologies yet to be invented, a lot of this of the technology developed. a lot of this will be nanotechnology. we will be able to record from a be hed
and technology industry. he is the keynote speaker at the economic club of washington. you conceive of life -- you can 12:30 p.m.e at eastern on c-span3. >> we can take pictures of the brain with scans and see the whole thing but there is a gap in the between about how the circuits in the brain function to be able to move my hand or to look at you and process that information or to lay down a memory. we do not know how that works. with technology yet to be invented, a lot of this will be nanotechnology, we need to be able to record from thousands of .rain cells at the same time as the brain activity map being talked about. getting to be a very exciting moment to put something together we could not have thought of. >> more with the nih director, dr. francis collins, sunday night at 8:00 on "q &a." >> according to an united nations, 70,000 have been killed since protests against syrian president assad. robert frod testified at a robert ford testified at a hearing. this is two hours and 15 minutes. >> this hearing will come to order. we need to review the syrian crisis. it was two years ago la
and process that information or to lay down a memory. we don't know how that works. with technology yet to be invented so a lot of this is going to be technology development and nano technology, what we aim to do is to be able to record from thousands maybe hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time and be able therefore to understand how these circuits work. that's the brain activity map that's being talked about. very early days we don't have a scientific plan yet about milestones and timetables and costs but it's getting to be a very exciting moment to put something together that we couldn't have thought of. >> more with nih director dr. france sess collins tonight at 8:00. now, president obama speaks to students in israel after meetings with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. and he reaffirmed his commitment to israel and discussed security concerns and the road to peace in the middle east. this is about an hour. >> well, it is a great honor to be with you here and i'm so grateful for the welcome that i've received from the people of israel. i bring with me the support of
are expensive, but tremendously important. that includes putting off, picking up technology that would assist us in detecting cyber attacks. we reduced or eliminated operational training and travel across the board. that is in an effort to make certain that we do everything can to ensure that we minimize any impact of furloughs, understanding that we're looking at not just fiscal year 2013 but 2014 as well. >> knowing of your integrity, you are a man of honesty and integrity, the american people should understand, sequestration will hurt. >> is going to hurt tremendously. the first thing you learn in the military and marine corps is that you take care of your troops. you take care of your troops. i think that is first. there is a real feel that troops are not being taken care of. these agents and personnel were in iraq for a substantial period of time, for afghanistan -- in afghanistan for a period of time. we have been asked to go to benghazi, libya, the attack on the embassy in tunisia, the algerian attacks, just to mention a few of the terrorist attacks across the ocean that we have had, 10,
. the internet is a global network without borders. our various technologies for trading all of that data. -- there are various technologies for all of that data. a lot of things are free on internet now may no longer be be free because costs are being raised. they could stop the growth of it. it is hard to measure the innovations that never make it to the market due to some governmental action. you cannot measure what never existed. wouldncertainty alone drive up costs and create some chaos and a lot of engineering headache's. hopefully our country and others will stand strong. what we really need to do is convince the developing world that this is not good for the human condition over wall. -- overall. >> senator bill nelson called for more information, for the fcc to require more information under the disclose act more political backing information to the displayed ads. >> for the disclose act regarding the disclosure of initical donors to groups the form of ads, it did not past. it is not the law of the land. there has been an argument from both the house and the senate that something
are looking you a process that information are laid down a memory. a lot of this is going to be technology development. what we aim to do is to be able to record from hundreds of thousands of brain cells of the same time. in be able to explain how these work. that is the brain activity message. >> we do not really have a scientific plan about timetables and costs. but is getting to be very exciting moment to put something together. >> half more sunday night at 8:00. >> in february, at comcast entered into a $16.7 billion deal to purchase the remaining 49% of nbc universal it did not alone. last week the chairman and ceo talked about his vision of the future. from the economic club of washington, this is about 50 minutes. >> we are very pleased today to have our guest to is the chairman and ceo of comcast. amcast is a company that has market capitalization of $107 billion. of about $20 billion earnings. it is an incredible company. 1963ompany was started in when bryant's father bought a company in tupelo. some of the may have heard of it. it is where elvis presley was born. it is better kno
a memory. we do not know how that works. a lot of this will be technology development. a lot of it will be nano- technology. we want to look at london's of thousands of brain cells at the same time to understand -- look at hundreds of thousands of plant cells at the same time. we do not have a scientific plan about milestones. it is getting to be an exciting moment to put something together that we cannot have thought of. nih director on c-span plus some "q & a." ofyou have been out commission since 2006. the chairman has been on since 2009. will we expect some turnover with the commission? >> we all have staggered terms. the past years have flown by quickly. we will see. i get asked this question every couple years. i am thinking about it, but we will see. i have thought about this several times, what comes after the commission. as a limited government position, we should not stay in these positions forever. i love my job. we have a lot of imported work to do. there weret week, resignations announced from the fcc. we spoke with a commissioner before his announcement. hear it
classified technology. corn espionage as a major concern -- foreign espionage is a major concern here it last week it in response to questions about the website for the hon still times reported, the cold didmay be over but spying not end with it. far from it, says a spokesman for the fbi field office. secret generated by hon still -- by huntsville. they went on to say it is a major target. said doesman paul damon you believe centers like target are specific -specific- centers are targets? what they are targets. -- >> they are targets and recognize that as a significant threat. we have a program called agent in the lab where we host agents to 17 of the research facilities and laboratories around the united states. they are embedded in research facilities to better understand and address that threat. a national security .igher education advisory board the leaders ofte these universities as to the occur at our can target their research facilities. i would say probably has gotten exacerbated in the realm of digital information and cyber attacks. you no longer have to rely on an individual becomes
technology to detect what this might be. i am sorry we did not get to that point. the very fact that we have -- i will not do anything to my good friend, let me clear the record, or anything on an airplane -- we cannot in any way suggest that someone with some sort of mental sort of situation that brings about the tragedy, some series of incidents that we have had with an airline pilot who had some sort of medical emergency that required him to be tied down -- generally , airing, domestic flights marshals are there, but nobody knows what the schedule is -- i want to leave at that. here is my final point to this mr. chairman. my final point is, it is very difficult for me to believe that we do not have mandatory training for our flight , that the solution will be that we add a voluntary hours -- you can ask me whether you have the money to voluntarily train them -- the fact that you are allowing a weapon can cause a terrible injury, and you are allowing it to come on without pausing for a moment with the concerns of members of congress. i would like us to go back to the drawing table. i would
generations smacks of insincerity when we recognize that americans' position as a global leader in technology and innovation depends on our ability to invest in the necessary infrastructure and training for such break throughs. that's why our budget would support billions of dollars of infrastructure and job training investments for the future of our nation and its citizens. americans are tired of watching their government lurch from one crisis to the next. the congressional black caucus offers a sincere credible path towards a long-term solution which creates jobs, expands the middle class, honors our commitment to seniors by preserving medicare and protecting medicaid and addresses our budgetary deficits and debt responsibly. these goals are achievable. but be clear, the ryan budget will not get us there. it is not the path to the nation's collective prosperity. it does not move us forward. democrats and members of the congressional black caucus propose that we move america forward. i thank you for the opportunity to address these important issues. and i yield back. mr. horsford: thank you,
not know how it works. a lot of this will be technologies that will be devout. a lot of this will be nano technologies. we need to be able to record thousands of brain cells at the same time and understand how the circuits work. that is a brain at to the map that is being talked about. we do not really have a map for , but it is is an exciting moment to put something together. nih directorthe dr. francis collins sunday night on c-span's "q&a." >> now actress mariska hargitay talks about efforts to help survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence, and child abuse. svu."tar of "law and order: this is under an hour. >> i am so honored and thrilled to be here today. thank you, angela. reminding me of the old days. [laughter] my heart is beating, and it is such an honor, thrilled to be here for so many reasons. i just came from standing with the vice president and attorney general holder at a press conference to highlight the dire and immediate need to reduce domestic violence homicides. and now here i am with all of you in washington dc, a very exciting day. the kind of day that makes your
? is it about ideas and times we live in? is it about the use of technology, and what do you think is the biggest driver for the sort of turmoil within the republican party? >> i think is generational. we went from three losing, 1980, 1984, 1988 -- not 2000. >> we only came in first place. >> it is generational. as these parties to look at the electorate, the democratic changes that are undergoing in our country, i think there is a dying breed of republicans that i grew up with, the conservative business, low-tax republicans, and it is a natural generational fight, and i agree, i hope they continue to battle it out until after we get a woman in the white house and do some other things. then you all come back from the dead in 2050. when the maya predicted the world would end in 2012, they were talking about republicans. whet o ggoi see the democratic party, e have enormous challenges as i see the democratic party, we have enormous challenges as well. i do not like the fact that my native south has a lot of republican governors. i like to make sure that the party is competitive in th
because they were in the pilfering their technology to syria. they have a carbon copy of their nuclear weapons program. deployed probably should have been continued. it is probably the case that it would head presented them with a choice of giving up that program in compromising or staying the course and facing the implosion. the situation today is much more dire for the regime. i have been in north korea. people leaving or career is one of having no confidence any longer. an ever smaller circle of people. on top of that we had very provocative behavior now they're calling into question his judgment on the part of people in north korea. certainly antagonizing this. causing discomfort. if the board to employ these controls -- if they were going to employ these controls and step up on the anti- proliferation initiative is we selfn place before where korea and other countries were stopping -- south korea and other countries were stopping ships that were bringing the , one of therts things they do is drugs, missile parts, armaments, of those ships on the high seas. you have cut all the mea
, stem cell research that treat disease. computer technologies that change the way people around the world live. if people want to see the world of the future economy, they , home ofok at tel aviv research centers and startups. [applause] are active on social media. every day seems to be a different facebook campaign on where i should give a speech. [laughter] [applause] that innovation is as important to the relationship between the united states and israel for security. our first free trade agreement in the world was reached with israel, nearly three decades ago. twoy the trade between our countries is at $40 billion every year. [applause] more importantly, that partnership has created new products and medical treatments and pushing new frontiers of science and exploration. that is the kind of should have israel and could have with every country in the world. innovation could reshape this region. there is a program in jerusalem that brings together young israelis and palestinians to learn vital skills in technology and business. and palestinian have joined together to begin a s
. it's very exciting in terms of the technology and the rest that is available to us to make real time information available for everyone to make our country healthier. if we had never had any problem with health care delivery systems or insurance denying care, it would have been absolutely necessary for us to pass the affordable care act because of the status quo was unsustainable financially. unsustainable for individuals, for families, for local government, state and federal government, unsustainable for large corporations. it's a competitiveness issue for our business community. and again federal government to go back unsustainable for our budget. you see by the report of the c.b.o., nonpartisan congressional budget office that already a large part due to the affordable care act, there's been a slow down in the increase of health care costs. that was one of our goals in the legislation. medicare has .4%, we talked about that before. medicaid, no increase. and that's very important to the affordable care act, it's very important to medicare and medicaid. it's very important to the a
changes in technology. when i visited them recently, we visited a whole group of ways that we can make sure the nhs is making these things available to more people and i am very committed to working with him and the center to ensure that happens. >> prime minister, you gave a promise to protect and defend the defense budget in its entirety. but you didn't. will you notr, guarantee that there will be -- >> order. the honorable gentleman
areas we addressed in the easier areas which is , utilizing, sensors the technology that we have. we have areas in arizona right haswhere the border patrol a gate where they can come across because they kept cutting the fence. it is not a big fence, it is a barbed wire fence. a made a gate so they can walk through. , sohe fence is not working your solution is to build another fence? >> no, you have to look at it in perspective. they cannot put things against it. went it is him -- when it is monitored, it works. when you look at the san diego border, we pretty much controlled that. we have good monitoring, we do not have much coverage coming across. we have not done everywhere else. we are saying it is too hard. -- it is not just dancing. , it isood intelligence utilizing a multipronged approach. control our we can borders. we have chosen not to. measure would be your when determining when the border is secured him a some time -- secured, some concrete numbers? congress would make that decision every year. are we maintaining the border? have we done what we need to do? i do not want t
, substantive actions, the demographic partners, campaign mechanics, technology, and the primary process. i want to point out that the recommendations are not limited to those five areas are even to the rnc. they can all learn something from this report. each of them is going to have a role to play. we are in the campaign business. our task will be to reach out to the most voters and build the best infrastructure ever. the policy aspects are most valuable for candidates. voters of all races and backgrounds need to understand that our policies offer a chance for a brighter future. the report offered some specific areas where republicans fell short. the are some ways the voters have been turned off. it highlighted republican innovation among our governors that have won over a new voters. it provides no ideas for the way forward. our candidates should take those recommendations to heart just as i have a. have a valuable role to play. the rnc will always be the leader in campaign mechanics. should takeallies it capabilities that can supplement our efforts in certain areas, voter registration, resear
to take immediate, substantive actions, the demographic partners, campaign mechanics, technology, and the primary process. i want to point out that the recommendations are not limited to those five areas are even to the rnc. they can all learn something from this report. each of them is going to have a role to play. we are in the campaign business. our task will be to reach out to the most voters and build the best infrastructure ever. the policy aspects are most valuable for candidates. voters of all races and backgrounds need to understand that our policies offer a chance for a brighter future. the report offered some specific areas where republicans fell short. the are some ways the voters have been turned off. it highlighted republican innovation among our governors that have won over a new voters. it provides no ideas for the way r the way- new ideas fo forward. our candidates should take those recommendations to heart just as i have a. groups also have a valuable role to play. the rnc will always be the leader in campaign mechanics. friends and allies should take it capabil
or lay down a memory. how it works. technology is yet to be invented, this will a lot be technology development. nanotechnology. we need to be able to record many hundreds of thousands of rentals at the same time. and therefore be able to understand how the circuits work. as the map and talk about. very early days. it is getting to be a very exciting moment to put something together that we could not have thought of. >> or with nih director dr. lins, send an edit clock on c-span's q&a. members discuss paul ryan's 2014 budget proposal. the continuing resolution to keep the federal government funded through the end of the fiscal year. at 10:00 a.m. on c-span3, the head of the federal finance agency testifies about the finance market are. >> 34 years >> the c-span networks, created by america's cable companies in 1979 and braut to you as a public service by your television provider. >> and in 45 minutes on washington, d.c., congressman steve appears g.o.p.'s political strategy is discussed. at 8:30 eastern,
our domestic demand. today new technologies have enabled us to access previously inaccessible energy resources, and almost overnight america's energy resource picture flipped from deficit to surplus. in the past five years we've become stronger as a nation through the developed of these god-given resources. as a result we are more competitive. from low income to the high tax brackets, everyone is benefiting. the future's bright but only if we educate the half truths and begin telling the real story of america's natural gas revolution. the stories about technology, private sector innovation, investment, financial risk, thousands of new jobs, new competition, new growth, a growing and better standard of living for more americans, lower energy costs, new industries, a revitalized energy sector, more jobs, more growth, energy security and optimism. this is the story of america's natural gas revolution. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentlelady from illinois seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house
that information, or to lay down a memory. we don't know how that works. that technology is yet to be invented, a lot of this will be technology development. a lot will be nanotechnology. what we aim to do is record, from maybe hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time. be able, therefore, to understand how the circuits work. that is the brain activity map that is being talked about. very early days, not even a scientific plan at about milestones and time tables and cost. it is getting to be an exciting moment to put something together that we could not have thought of. >> more with nih director, dr. francis collins, sunday on "q&a." >> now, actress mariska hargitay speaks to the national press club about her work with survivors of domestic violence and child abuse. the star of "law & order: svu" is also the founder of the joyful foheart foundation. this is just under one hour. am so honored and thrilled to be here today. thank you, angela. reminding me of the old days. [laughter] my heart is beating, and it is such an honor, thrilled to be here for so many reasons. i just came fro
such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad to talk about that today. but i do believe these connections are important for us and will be so going forward into the future. members of the committee, i will conclude by saying again, thank you on behalf of the men and women of u.s. european command. thank you for the support of this committee. i will pass your thanks onto them as well. i look forward to answering your question this morning. >> thank you very much. from admiral stavridis to general jacoby. >> thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today. it is a pleasure to be here with my friends and fellow combatants i am not as big of an army guy as john is. but we are here to protect. i appreciate this committee and the continued support of our important missions. includes homeland defense, and that is our number one priority mission. it is a mission which we work closely with canada in our fully integrated national comma
ever before. joint exercises than ever before. we provide security assistance and technology to israel than ever before. that includes more support for missile defenses, like iron dome. it has saved many israeli lives. the american support for israel is unprecedented. it has never been stronger. that is a sturdy foundation we built on today as he addressed a range of shared challenges. as part of our long-term commitment to israel security, the prime minister and i agreed to extend military assistance to israel. our current agreement lasts through 2017. we have decided to extend it for years beyond. i'm pleased to announce we will assure that there is no interrupting of funding for iron dome. decisions i made last year, israel will receive approximately 200 million dollars this fiscal year. we will continue to work with congress on future funding of iron dome. these are further reminders we theirelp to preserve military edge so that israel can defend itself by itself against any threat. we also discussed a way forward for a two state solution between israel and palestine. i will be mee
in terms of the technology that is available to us to make real- time information available to help make our country healthier. if we had never had any problem with health care delivery systems or insurance, denying care, it would have been absolutely necessary for us to pass the affordable care act, because of the status quo with unsustainable costs financially, unsustainable for individuals, families, local and state governments, for large corporations, it is a competitiveness issue for our and and unsustainable for our government. you see by the report of the cbo, the nonpartisan congressional budget office, that a large part due to the affordable care act there has been a slowdown in the increase of health care costs, and that was one of our goals in the legislation. aboutre is .4%, we talked that before, medicaid, no increase, and that is very import for the federal care act, very important medicare and medicaid, very important to the american people and the great middle class. already, there is no denial of care for pre-existing conditions for 17 million children. starting next yea
drilling technology, america will soon have an energy surplus. this is trillions of dollars in new wealth for americans. trillions of dollars. oreign-policy not overly influenced by oil. how about food? america will be the saudi arabia of grain in a century when the world is clamoring for more food. just as crude oil determines the wealth and power of nations in the latter part of the last century, we will do so in this century. rapid advances are transformed at a breathtaking pace. manufacturing jobs that were shipped to china a decade ago are now returning to america. beingime, the work is performed by our robots. the good news is, there are robots built in america by american workers. by low energy cost, they create a new wave of energy manufacturing in this country. classes of diseases are on the verge of being eradicated by manipulating individual molecules on the surfaces of living sales. -- living cells. never getting lost, never having accidents, already a prototype car has driven more than 3000 miles in the maze of california without a single accident. 3-d printing machines are b
with disabilities over many years. they are making the most of extraordinaire changes in technology. when i visited them recently we look at hold draft of ways which we to make sure the nhs is making these things available to more people and a very committed to working with him and the center to make sure that happens. >> russell brown. >> thank you very much, mr. speaker. prime minister conjugated promise to protect and defend budget in its entirety. that you didn't. the defence secretary who promised to balance the budget at the national audit office said he failed. prime minister, will you now guaranteed that there will be -- >> order, order. the honorable gentleman has been here 16 years. he shouldn't use the word you injury. sorry buddy makes the rules. quickly, finish the qustion. >> will a commitment be given that defense budget would be protected for the in this parliament? >> the commitment i can give hi is that the 38 billion black hole that we inherited has been got rid of and freeze the budget across this part at 33 billion pounds gives us the fourth largest defense budget in the world.
on technological prowess. that highlighted important continuities in more for that have to be taken into consideration at the outset. >> i mean this with respect. will we ever learn those lessons? early in the thinking about iran -- as i listen to you i thought we might well have learned a lot of those lessons. it is not so obvious that much has changed in terms of the learning, has its? >> that is yet to be seen. ultimately you can make the argument that what we learned from the wars in both iraq and afghanistan will be as important as the outcome of those wars. we do we learn these lessons every time we go to war. the question is, will we be at all to understand these lessons and apply them to how we structure our national defense and how we prepare our civilian and military leaders to deal with future threats to national and international security. i think remains to be seen. there are some major impediments to us learn these lessons. theof those impediments is tendency in the conventional wisdom to view these wars dismissively as wars of choice or aberrations. unless you are goi
it in the easy areas, which is a double fence with sensors, utilizing the technology that we is brokenow when it and when it comes through. we have areas in arizona right -- where the border patrol so they can come across because they keep cutting defense. it is not a big fence. .t is a barbed wire fence they mitigate so they can walk through. >> so the fence isn't working, your solution is to build another fence? >> no, you have to see this in perspective. if you look at the fence we put up, it is effective. they can't put things up against it. when it is monitored, it slows. if you look in the san diego border area, we control that. where we have good fencing and good monitoring, we don't have much coming across. we just have not done everywhere else. hard., it is too no, we have to prioritize assets to control the border. intelligence on both sides of the border, in terms of what is going on. prongedtilizing a multi- approach. the point is, we can control our border. we have chosen not to yet. >> "washington journal" continues. here tonger gibson is talk about congress of winning a governm
, which is a double fence with sensors, with utilizing the technology that we have to know when it's broken and when it comes through. look, we have areas in arizona right now where we've -- the border patrol has gut a gate so they can come across because they kept cutting the fence. and it's not a big fence. it's a barbed wire fence. but so they wouldn't have to keep repairing the fence they made a gate to come through. >> so your solution is to build another fence? >> no. you have to see this in perspective. if you look at the fence that we've put up, the real fence, it's fairly effective. they can't put things up against it. but when it's monitored it's going -- it markedly slows. if you look at the san diego border area, we've pretty well controlled that. where we have good fencing and good monitoring, we don't have much coverage coming across there. we just haven't done it everywhere else. and we have said, well, it's too hard. no. it's just we have to prioritize the assets to actually control the border. and it's not just fencing. it's good intelligence on both sides of the b
mismatch. their belief that the technology is going to fix the problem, i believe the evidence suggests that it is not. the gentleman in the blue tide. -- tie. i worked as the united nations spokesman in iraq for five years. i wanted to comment on the hundreds of billions of dollars that was wasted under something called the project reconstruction teams. they would start something and it never goes forward. never would it be completed. where did the money go? >> won the reasons that we wrote the book was that people had the sense that we are spending a lot, but it's very difficult to get your arms around what that means. when it comes to the reconstruction money, that is particularly hard to think about. just to put it in context, in afghanistan we spent $87 billion on afghani reconstruction, most of which the pentagon, as they put it, had lost visibility on it. compare that to the national park where we spend $2.5 billion a year to support all of the national parks. if you ask most americans, they would say that is a bad allocation of resources. theonal parks versus -- u.s. portion of
because of globalization and technology. and we cannot do these two things, we cannot change the fiscal trajectory of this country and we cannot make investments in our future and our children unless we do two things. first, reform the entitlement programs in this country and second, take actions to raise evenues. last year 13% of the american population was over 65. in 2030, 20% of the american population will be over 65. this singular fact dominates our whole discussion around our fiscal future. just to put this into perspective, if we don't change the trajectory of our entitlement programs, in 10 years they will consume 70% of our spending and literally crowd out every other priority we have as a country. and just to put this in a sharper focus, right now as a country, if you add up all the spending at the federal, state and local level on americans over 65, that number is $27,000 per year. if you do the same math on americans under 18, that number is $11,000 a year. -- 2.5 -- 1/2-1 -- 2- 2.5-1 ratio. i don't think we should spend less on the early elderly. i don't think -- on the e
of the four missiles space activity center and later director of science and technology at the cia was pleased because to get more technical analysis. he is turning my great technical assistance into english. i raised remember him calling me in and saying you will is remembered as the guy that writes peter rabbit -- peter rabbit english. the difficulty of assessing egyptian intentions, office of cyanide 1973. you must remember the conduct military exercises in may and august causing military mobilization twice at great cost to tele-tv. i recall working with the head of the middle east and south asian branch at office of strategic research to ensure we have a right kind of collection. technical, human. so we have the requirements out. welle understood pretty the so but rigid soviet military shipments. we did not always know the content. content of what was in the shipments, but we knew they were very sizable back in those years. of egyptiannding and syrian forces in those locations was only fair. our son did -- our own understanding of the military intentions were very poor. real- time we lack
the benefit of health information technology. it addresses the sose yo economic determinants of health beginning with the 10-20-30 program to reduce poverty. it will reduce health care spending in the medium and long-term. it's a masterpiece of a budget and i urge everyone vote for it. yes, we will not be happy until every american has access to quality health care. i yield back. the chair: the time the gentlelady has expire thsmed gentleman from georgia. mr. broun: what time remains on both sides? the chair: the gentleman from georgia has three minutes remain, the gentleman from virginia has fife and a half minutes remaining. -- as five and a half minutes remaining. the gentleman from georgia has the right to close. mr. broun: may i inquire of my friend how many more speakers he has? mr. scott: i think we have two ore speakers including myself. mr. broun: we reserve. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from virginia. mr. scott: i yield two minutes to the gentlelady from -- to the gentlelady, ms. waters. the chair: the gentlelady is recognized. ms. waters: as a member of t
that the technology is going to fix the problem, i believe the evidence suggests that it is not. the gentleman in the blue tie. >> i worked as the united nations spokesman in iraq for five years. i wanted to comment on the hundreds of billions of dollars that was wasted under something called the project reconstruction teams. they would start something and it never goes forward. never would it be completed. where did the money go? >> won the reasons that we wrote the book was that people had the sense that we are spending a lot, but it's very difficult to get your arms around what that means. when it comes to the reconstruction money, that is particularly hard to think about. just to put it in context, in afghanistan we spent $87 billion on afghani reconstruction, most of which the pentagon, as they put it, had lost visibility on it. compare that to the national park where we spend $2.5 billion a year to support all of the national parks. if you ask most americans, they would say that is a bad allocation of resources. national parks versus -- the u.s. portion of the reconstruction funding has
technologies and the logistics is creating a functioning palestinian state is becoming more difficult. both sides have to begin to think about their long-term strategic interests instead of worrying about, can i get a short-term tactical advantage there or here? they need to say to themselves what is the big picture and how do we get this done? that is ultimately i believe both people want. i think it is interesting that my speech in jerusalem, some of the strongest applause came when i addressed the israeli people and i said you have to think about the palestinian children like your own children. it tapped into something that they understood. that gives me hope. i think that shows there's a possibility there. but it is hard. what i also said was ultimately people have to help provide the structures for leaders to take some difficult risks. so that's why i wanted to speak directly to the israeli people and the palestinian people. so they can help empower their leadership to make some difficult decisions and tradeoffs in order to achieve a compromise where neither side will get 100% of what
that information or to lay down and memory. we don't know how that works. with technology yet to be invented, this will develop. a lot of this will be nano- technology. fromybe have to record hundreds of brain cells at the same time and be able to understand how these circuits work. that is the brain activity that about.g talked we are very -- we're in very early days. it is getting to be a very exciting moment to put something together that we could not have thought about more with the nih director tonight at 8:00. >> this morning, a discussion on president obama's trip to the middle east. then, senior white house correspondent will discuss the history and importance of id
technology has created in lots of industries, you would expect financial services to be somewhat bigger. i do not know the answer to the question. i think my predecessor's claim that the only contribution to the financial industry is the automatic teller machine might be a little exaggerated. i know some people have that view. again, i do not know the answer. the somewhat bigger financial sector can be justified by the wider range of services and a more -- >> hi, i am jeremy dodge and. i have a follow-up question on cyprus. i am a central banker. do think it was appropriate or fair to impose a levy on every bank deposit in cyprus, even those insured by the european union? >> i have not been involved in those conversations. i do not necessarily know of the details. i know they are grappling with the difficult problem. i think the issue they face is that there is a big financial hole in the sense there is a fiscal issue and a bank recapitalization issue. they're looking for resources where they can find them. i think everybody understands there are certain risks with that, besides the equity is
down a memory. we do not know how that works. with technology, yet to be invented, so a lot of this is going to be nanotechnology, what we need to do is be able to record may be hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the maybe ime -- record hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time. we do not have a time frame, but it is getting to be a very exciting moment to put something together that we could not have thought of. >> the article says it is going to be hard to do that than the human genome project. >> i agree. we were done. it is hard top, say when you would complete the effort because the brain is enormously complicated. thetrillion cells, all of ways they interact with each other. we will never be able to say, "we got it." what are we talking about with the activity map, not that we will reveal all of the secrets, but that we will reveal some of them in an ordered away and that nails down some of those goals -- >> when will it start, and how much will it cost? >> still to be discussed. we hope to start at least some pilot efforts in the next year. i cannot g
i am able to move my hand or to lay down a memory. we don't know how that works. with technology yet to be invented, so a lot of this is going to be technology invented or nano technology. but we need to be able to record hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time and be able to understand how it works. that's brain mas analysis that's at work. we don't really have work yet for milestones and that but it's getting to be a very exciting moment to put together thooth was never thought of. >> dr. francis collins on "q&a." "washington journal" continues. host: and we're back with steve pearce. you were the feature of a front page article. one g.o.p. lawmaker shows how to woo latino voters. what's your attraction? guest: well, we go into areas typically republicans have not gone. we have some communities that are 85% hispanic. he lulac guys and so it's just many doing my job, frankly. host: with the headline after the r.n.c. put out their report post port you mean the hispanic vote key for republicans to win the election and in this report it said republicans need to vote for o
. leading up to it, they used certain technology, welcome to , saddamtruction hussein. ira member during that time, if i see the word saddam hussein one more time, it was like a steady drumbeat of information that the government put out. the media -- you know, the media was just basically going along with it. i mean, it was like the slogans the used, we must support troops. it just went on and on and on. they actually walked into that war. -- those articles you just mentioned from the wall street journal, a lot of people don't understand, the wall street journal is owned by the same company that owns fox news. they are just -- that is what i am saying. the media has just rolled over. they rolled over during the buildup to the iraq war. as far as any real, strong media in this country -- it used to be -- [indiscernible] longer there. it was amazing. host: another moment from the iraq war, when it was announced on march 19, 2003, president bush from the white house that evening. [video clip] at this hour, american and coalition forces to disarm iraq, to free its people and to free the worl
in memory. we don't know how that works. with technologies yet to be invented, a lot of this is going to be technology development, a lot of it will be nanotechnology, what we aim to do is be able to record from thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands of brain cells at the same time, be able therefore to underis stand how these circuits work. that's the brain activity map that's being talked about. very early days we don't really have a scientific plan about milestones and timetables and costs, but it's getting to be a very exciting moment to put something together that we couldn't have thought of. >> more with n.i.h. director dr. francis collins, sunday night at :00 on c-span's "q&a." off the floor of the u.s. senate report that democrats are dropping the assault weapons ban from their gun bill, making the approval of the bill -- ban unlikely. the c.q. congressional quarterly reports that senator dianne feinstein of california all but conceded today that the assault weapons banshee has spent months urging congress to renew will not become law. saying quote i very much regret it, i tri
in this age of technological advances every one of us can construct an information environment that only reinforces what we already believe. if you think about it, it's human nature. i want to reach out to the smartest people in the world. i want to read the smartest people, i want to listen to the smartest people. who are the smartest people? the people who agree with me. depending on who you are those people hang out on fox news or msnbc but really on both. congress makes a point that creates a particular challenge for members of coonged i'm fog to come to congressman gonzales on this. schwarz talks about most citizens are not and should not be bipartisan. it's their elected leadsers who should be able to reach across ideological lines to find opportunity for cooperation. chris cox is right. we live in an i pod nation as voters. how much harder does it make it for congress to reach out across party lines given those challenges and what can be done o make that challenge less onerous. >> that was talked about earlier. the context is in my belief that american society is undergoing tremen
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